Coronavirus

Kothel cafe owner Ed gives away bread, milk and tea to local people aged over 70

By Ian Marland at

A Glasgow coffee shop owner is giving comfort to vulnerable groups in uncertain times.

Ed Avdiasi has mobilised his staff to bake bread and provide other produce that can be given away.

He has set up a ‘takeaway shelter’ at his Kothel coffee shop on Crow Road.

Sign board

Staff at Kothel are doing their bit for the community.

On Saturday morning he began serving local people who were calling by.

His stall had milk, dried pasta and cakes, as well as teas and coffees to go.

He is taking normal payment and donations from paying customers but people over 70 are being served free.

He hopes to begin deliveries to people’s doors in the coming days.

‘Terrible situation’

Ed, who runs five businesses in Glasgow including nearby Pianola in Broomhill, says he is not sure how long he can keep up the effort but he is determined to help people.

“This is a terrible situation for everyone, goodness knows when it is going to end.

“I wanted to do my bit for my customers and for elderly people who may not be able to get out.

“I still have to make some money to pay my staff, but the produce is free to people over 70.”

Eduardo and the bread from his bakery.

Ed and the bread from his bakery.

Ed recently opened a bakery which is now providing bread for the community.

He ordered 20 tonnes of flour several weeks ago before the restrictions began to hit.

He hopes that supply will keep people going for a few weeks.

The milk and pasta would normally be consumed by customers in his cafes and restaurant.

‘I wanted to do my bit for my customers and for elderly people who may not be able to get out’

Eduardo

Kothel and his other outlets have now closed to sit-in customers following the latest instructions from governments.

Ed said businesses like his were having to adapt quickly to a changing landscape.

“We hope to continue doing take-outs from Kothel but who knows how long that will continue.

“I want to keep my staff in jobs for as long as I can.

“I employ nearly 50 fifty people.”

Eduardo

Eduardo ordered 20 tonnes of flour several weeks ago

Ed was born in Albania and came to Scotland to work and later start up his business.

He has family who live in Italy and has been told first-hand about conditions there.

“It is a terrible situation in Italy.

“I think it is important that everyone pulls together in times likes this.”